Welcome to 'Lost in the Myths of History'

It often seems that many prominent people of the past are wronged by often-repeated descriptions, which in time are taken as truth. The same is also true of events, which are frequently presented in a particular way when there might be many alternative viewpoints. This blog is intended to present a different perspective on those who have often been lost in the myths of history.

Friday, 2 December 2011

Prince Albert and Typhoid - A Myth?

From the first history books I ever read as a child, right through to those written today, it was repeatedly stated that Prince Albert died of typhoid, probably due to the dirty drains at Windsor. Though I have no proof, I seriously suspect that this is a myth. The prince, I believe, was suffering – and had been for a long time – from some more pernicious illness which, combined with his mental state, eventually led to his premature death.

The rest of this post has been temporarily removed due to an agreement re. the recent publication of my book "Queen Victoria's Granddaughters 1860-1918"

14 comments:

Matterhorn said...

What a tragedy.

Christina said...

Yes, Matterhorn, I agree - thank you :-). It could have been so different....

Val said...

Christina - thank you for addressing this here. I had never particularly given his condition a second thought, until you had mentioned it. It would be very interesting to see the case "re-opened" and hear of other findings. You have some very good points and I think it deserves a second look. Either way....what a tragic end to the life of an outstanding man.

Christina said...

Thank you, Val :-). It was a tragic end, wasn't it? I can't help thinking, though, that he just gave up and left...Maybe he had had enough :-(.

Lorraine said...

interesting.....

Gem said...

I was wondering about this whole thing before, as I see it quite odd that Prince Albert was the only one to get the disease even though typhoid was an epidemic disease. Thank you for this interesting and enlightening post, Christina.

History and Women said...

I tend to agree with your suspicions. It wouldn't be unusual to keep illnesses secret from the public. Nicely written.

Christina said...

Thank you, Lorraine, Gem and History & Women, for your comments. It looks like we all agree on this!

Anonymous said...

Thank you.

Tess

Val said...

Christina - I think you have a good point about him just giving up, perhaps. Sometimes, we all reach our limit. I often think about how Alice died on the same day as him too.... talk about tragic!

The Gentleman said...

I have studied Prince Albert for several years [I portray him at an historical fair], and I have come to the opinion that he basically worked himself to death.
He never seemed to entirely relax, he was frequently up against enormous opposition, was never as eloquent in English as his opponents, and while he was able to accomplish several great things and finally won the trust and affection of the English people it was a constant uphill battle.
The information you bring up is excellent and you may very well be right. Thank you for address this historical mystery :-)

Christina said...

Thank you, Val, for drawing attention to Princess Alice, too! :-)

Thank you, Gentleman, for your comment. I agree about him working himself to death and how dreadful it was that so brilliant a man was made to feel such an outsider for so long. What a wonderful time you must have portraying him! What a lovely 'job'!)

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know who created the picture and when?
Thanks :)

Christina said...

Thank you for your comment. I am sorry, I do not know who created it but I would imagine it was very soon after Prince Albert's death. Perhaps someone else could clarify it...